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japan'is's eye view of damaged nuclear plant. the effort to cool it goes on. people living near this facility flee for safety. japan fears as many as 15,000 may have died. welcome to "bbc world news." forces come to's benghazi. he delivers a radio message. >> we are coming on this happy day. tomorrow, benghazi will change and there will again be a fun, dance, and cries of joy. >> has japanese nuclear engineers battle to prevent a disaster, there is no let up. half a million people made homeless by friday's earthquake and tsunami. more supplies are reaching survivors. many still lack basic necessities. dozens of the evacuation centers have been set up. thousands were forced to flee from the nuclear exclusion zone. >> they come seeking refuge. fleeing tradition of's nuclear plant -- fukushima's nuclear plant and carrying what is most precious to them. there is a chance for radiation. more than 1000 have arrived here already. there are reunions. exhaustion and relief. this family was just 5 miles from the damaged reactor. as they made it here, the fuel in their car was running out.
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
cannot confirm. >>> and we continue to follow the nuclear crisis in japan as the pressure rises inside the reactor at the fukushima plant. we want to welcome the viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm natalie allen and this is cnn "world report." coalition forces are taking action to try and stop libya's leader from attacking his people. officials say allied planes and missiles have taken out about 20 libyan air and missile defense targets since saturday. there you can see the skies lit up with anti-aircraft fire. they say civilians are paying a heavy price. libya reports 48 dead and more than 150 injured. cnn is not able to confirm those figures. u.s. says they will assess the damage done so far in libya. but gadhafi isn't known for giving in to international pressure. as expected he remains defiant. he says other nations have no right to intervene in libya internal affairs. he spoke on libya state tv as soon as there were the attacks. >> translator: all targets -- maritime targets will be exposed to real danger. lithuania and north africa. because of this aggression a
cutting off access for residents. >>> and japan's earthquake and tsunami hit close to home for one bay area city with a unique tied to the devastated region -- a unique tie to that devastated region. >> complete bay area news starts right now. this is bay area news at 7:00. >> good evening. it is monday, march 21. i am gasia mikaelian, and this is bay area news at 7:00. >>> a developing story tonight where a rockslide has blocked the road cutting off some homes and preventing some people from returning home. but hillside gave away about 10:00 this morning we have a live picture here from newschopper two and 20 people are stuck with no way in or out. we are told that the geologists are looking at the slide but there is no word yet on how long it may take to clear its. continuing coverage and a full report on our 10:00 news. >>> some thought this day may never arrive but opening statements will begin tomorrow in barry bonds perjury trial. as david stevenson reports, jury selection began and ended today. >> reporter: barry bonds walked confidently into court this morning as jury selec
. the japanese government has to help 0 to fund the investment. japan's energy body. the brazilian mining firm has a huge share of the world niobium market. it is needed to make high grade steel plates for automobiles. ni ppo n steel has been getting its steel from the brazilian firm. a leading steel maker is planning to acquire 5% stake in the same mining firm. >>> the united states is hoping japan will join a transpacific free trade agreement. u.s. trade representative ron kirk spoke on wednesday at a trade symposium. >> japan's future will be as its past was and that is being a competitor in a robust, global environment but that meant japan was going to have to confront the challenge of opening its agricultural market. >> kirk praised japan's decision to join the tpp negotiations in an annual report issued this week. the office stated one of the goals for 2011 is substantial progress on the tpp. it is a u.s.-backed multilateral free trade agreement for the region. >>> negotiations are underway between the united states, australia and seven other countries. japan will decide whether to parti
, what happened in japan, like everybody else. it's just so devastating. i can't imagine that there's going to be one agency in massachusetts who just says, you go here, you here -- i'm concerned not only in massachusetts but throughout the country if something like this happens, i'm not confident yet and i'm hopeful someone can give me the information that make sure that we all know what to do. you know? is it evacuation? is it command and control? is it military? i think it's a combination of everything. can you shed any light on my thoughts? >> in timely, i can start and then like to have an opportunity, senator brown -- >> just do that. i don't want to take the senator's time. >> i want to make one point. >> i think you're asking an important question. >> okay. >> i'd urge -- >> many of our disasters -- we always start with who's going to be the closest responders, no matter how big the disaster. it's always the local responders. we saw this, they can be destroyed, in the disaster itself. we saw this in katrina and in the tsunami. the next is the governor and their team includin
the nikkei down about 8%. that came despite several moves by japan's central bank to try to stabilize that fragile economy. >>> the u.s. military is operating helicopter rescue missions off the aircraft carrier "uss ronald reagan" and so far this morning they've rescued stranded survivors, delivered supplies and helped move injured to the hospital. as our christiane amanpour found out, so many much is needed. >> translator: i need food. i'm running out of food, says this business woman. the good news is some aid was prepositioned. part of japan's earthquake preparedness. we're trying to feed 2,000 people, maybe more. we'll continue as long as our rice lasts, says this aid worker. but the rice, like the rest of the supplies, is not nearly enough. so much more is needed and the effort is heshg lee yan. we saw that firsthand at the red cross command center here. what is your biggest challenge right now? >> the biggest challenge is for our relief operation at this moment is logistics. >> reporter: much of northern japan's infrastructure is in tathers as we saw from the air. coastal roads,
and campbell's cream of chicken soup. campbell's.® it's amazing what soup can do.™ japan's prime minister calling this the worst crisis since world war two. rescue workers searching devastation of four survivors of the earthquake and tsunami hitting japan and growing concerns of the nuclear meltdown. good afternoon and steve. >> 9 dina welcome our viewers across the country and watching us on the web. official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami now stands at more than 1800 but the number will rise as rescuers reach more hard hit areas. a news agency reports about 2000 bodies were found in just two areas on the northeast coast today. one of those areas about 10,000 people are still missing. the full extent of the disastrous aftermath is not yet clear but it to be the most extensive expensive quicken history. experts say that losses from the quake tsunami in fire wall " that least $100 billion. . >> major complications pleading three reactors at a nuclear power plant and that is raising fears of a meltdown. another reactor lost its cooling capabilities after a blast at the
office on thursday. the australiaens are visiting japan until wednesday on a trip sponsored by the japanese government. he said he felt deep remost and offered a heart felt apology for the tremendous suffering of so many people including australian pows. richards called it a historic event saying they are significant to the p.o.w.s. and their families. also said the government will begin preparations to deliver similar copies to other former australian p.o.w.s. over the weekend they are scheduled to visit sites where they were held during the war. >>> turning to our japan syndrome series, we look at the challenges created by this country's aging and declining population. some of those challenges are sparking business opportunities, nursing care for one is something many asian nations are focusing on. there's a reason behind this. the graph shows the percentage of people who are older than 65 in five asian countries them elderly population of thailand and china will reach 14% in 20 years. that means they will be considered so-called aged societies. at the same time, japan, si
the quake, waves of terror washed upon japan's shores. wiping out towns, roads, everything in its way. >> the sheer scope of the disaster caused delays in rescue efforts in many cities, including kesennuma. the bbc rupert winfield hayes was there when rescue teams arrived three days after the quake. >> reporter: in kesennuma, reality has been turned on its head. a large ship sits on a dock side. a fishing boat on top of a car. a car on top of a fence. and a house in the middle of the street. this was kesennuma on friday as the massive tsunami swept in, tossing boats aside like children's toys, uprooting houses and turning the city streets into torrents of angry blackwater. much of kesennuma is still under water and walled in by mountains of debris. every street we tried to get down is jammed with piles of cars. even the rescuers are struggling to find a way in. when they do, mostly what they're finding are bodies. this one, a man found trapped underneath a car. nearby, i find this man. his house has been completely destroyed. you can see the tide mark at the top of
accomplish nothing. and grappling with the new reality, japan looks for strength as the death toll climbs. >> we are following two developing stories this hour on "world report." hello, i'm fionnuala sweeney and i want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. in libya, dawn approaches this sunday morning with "operation odyssey dawn" well under way. french, u.s., and british coalition forces began hammering key libyan installations late on saturday to enforce a no-fly zone newly approved by the u.n. security council. responding to the fighter jets and cruise missiles, moammar gadhafi's defenses have been peppering libya's skies with anti-aircraft fire. here now the very latest. the pentagon saying that so far, more than 100 u.s. and british tomahawk cruise missiles have slammed into libyan targets aimed primarily at air defense systems. despite the ways of attacks libyan leader gadhafi remains defiant, condemning the coalition strikes and urging people around the world to aid in libya's defense. the british prime minister, david cameron, calls the allied effort ag
the nuclear reactors in japan. the japanese government saying spinach and milk taken from farms near the fukushima plant exceed safety limits for radiation. officials are quick to add the food poses no emergency risks. >>> ctrying to cool reactors hoping to reconnect four reactors sometime today to get the cooling systems back online. >>> new numbers this morning on the extent of the tragedy. at least 7,200 people are dead and nearly 11,000 remain missing. >>> let's head to tokyo now and nbc's robert bazell with the latest. good morning, robert. >> reporter: hello, alex. the japanese government just announced that it found radiation in a few samples of milk and spinach taken from tartarp farms, not right close by but the general northern area of the country. now, the government says these amounts are very small. to give you a comparison if you drank one glass of milk every day for a year, you would get the same amount of radiation as you would have you had a ct scan and if you ate one portion of spinach every day for a year, 1/5 at much. tlap sh that shows why efforts to keep the rea
anniversary where workers gathered outside of the three mile island plant. those offered prayers to japan. mary, back to you. >>> thank you, the final death toll is expected to reach 18,000 with hundreds of thousands still homeless. >>> the united states government confirms small amounts of radiation have made its way to america. derek valcourt has more on what is being done about it. >> reporter: radiation levels found in the u.s. are minuscule. so small that the state and government are urging people not to worry about it. it's a long trip from the site of the disaster to hear in the united states. some radiation has made it. sunday, federal officials announce a radioactive form of iodine that's been detected in rain water in pennsylvania and further north in massachusetts. the epa says that those radiation levels are about 25 times below the level that would be of concern for the most vulnerable infants and pregnant women. >> it's much less still than a regular plane flight. if you get an x-ray, that's highier radiation. >> reporter: the state health officials say that the routine amou
midday news. >> good afternoon. >> our top story today the3 devastation in japan. more on3 the latest developments from japan. spiking radiation levels and a cloud of smoke or steam forced workers to evacuate the nuclear power plant. it was devastated by the earthquake. government officials say the smoke was presumed to beat vapor. earlier in the day a fi'4 reactor. new concern over fuel rods which could release dangerous radiation if caught fire. >> to have one fire is serious. to have a fire when you have problems at other plants is serious. the danger to those of fuel pond's increases. >> a japanese self-defense force helicopter had to abort the mission to drop water over the reactor because of radiation levels. they've been trying to resolve cooling problems at four of the plants. 12,000 is the latest number of dead and missing in japan. it is still6 0 deaths and more than 2200 injured. another 8200 are missing. the number of dead is expected to go up as rescuers make their way to hard-hit area. >> more than a million homes are still without power which means survivors
for joining us here on "bbc world news." s that the situation in -- well, that is the situation in japan. many people still missing. thousands homeless. a british national who wants to leave the country who are working or living in tokyo or the northeast should do so if they wish. that is word from outside the foreign office. >> that was live from tokyo. plenty more from japan throughout thexd next couple of hours here on "bbc world news." let's get the latest indication for the tokyo stock market. how has-been has it been today? >> it's been another volatile session. on monday and tuesday the japanese stock market dropped by añr total of 16% then went back up on wednesday. today it has slipped up again. the nikkei closed down by a further 1.5%. this is despite the bank of japan pumping money into the system. we've seen the yen rising to these record highs not seen since the second world war. looking at toyota. of course, toyota is a huge exporter. they are watching their shares falling, despite saying they will be trying to resume their car plants. >> now the task of rebuilding japan's infra
radioactive water inside japan's crippled nuclear plant could indicate a partial meltdown of one of the reactors. and a third of a million cars lost from production, japan's car industry reopens a handful of plants. it's midday here in london and 2:00 p.m. across libya, where the rebels march west in developing a new momentum, thanks to the allied air strikes. they've been able to advance into colonel gaddafi's heartland without meeting much resistance. let's go to ben brown in eastern libya. >> you join us here right by the coastal highway that leads to sirte. now, we're just outside ras lanuf which has a huge oil refinery, which is firm until rebel hands. they captured it yesterday. then they moved to a town of bin jawad, which they also captured. today they're claiming they captured sirte, the hometown of colonel gaddafi. that is being disputed by news agency reporters on the ground in sirte. the rebels, though, have claimed that they've taken it, and when they announced that news back at the rebel stronghold of benghazi last night, where we were, that was met with wild celebr
. one is honing her presidential qualifications. we will talk about japan in a few moments. this is the latest from "usa today." the death toll rises in japan. people are still being found alive. and 80 year old wrapped in a blanket found nine days after the earthquake in the tsunami hit. she and her grandson were rescued from their home in northern japan. phoenix, ariz.. what should the u.s. mission in libya be? caller: we should not be there right now. we are in bad shape energy wise, no renewable energy program like we should have. we are trying to get oil, in this case libya. next time maybe venezuela. that is instead of focusing on clean energy, not those that come down a radioactive plumes. nuclear is not clean energy. that is absurd. we are trying to get oil under any condition. right now it is libya. then iran and venezuela. read"shock doctrine." there will be a military coup in libya. there'll be no leadership for resistance. the military will take over and we will fund a ton of money to them. then we will privatize the oil industry and trigger it over to big oil i
strikes against libya and the setback on the power plant in japan. that's next on cnn news room. >>> i want to get you up to speed. the united states carried out a new round of air strikes on libyan military targets overnight. a spokesman suggests u.s. combat operations may have peaked. the u.s. role is in the no-fly zone. it's moving from action to patrolling phase today. libyan handlers took journalists to see damage inside gadhafi's compound. that happened earlier today. a possible missile wrecked a four-story building. gadhafi was not the target. >>> defense secretary robert gates arrived in russia today as that country's prime minister turned up the heat. putin ripped the united states for what he called a steady trend of intervention abroad. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition and be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition. >> arab league president is toning down his criticism of the coalition attacks. he met with u.n. secretary moon in cairo today sa
from japan. one, two, three, four ♪ you say ♪ flip it over and replay ♪ we'll make everything okay ♪ walk together the right way ♪ do, do, do, do >>> the sky in libya lit up by more tomahawk officials. president obama says he wants the dictator out but removing him from power is not the mission of the allies. the coalition goal is to protect citizens from attacks by gadhafi and his loyalists but the big question today is what is happening with this coalition of nations once so willing to work together, is it starting to fray? let's bring in retired general wesley clark who is live in little rock. there seems to be confusion about who is exactly in charge of this mission. i mean, norway seems confused and britain and italy say nato should take over but france nato should not take over. an american plane went down today. this isn't exactly the best time to figure out details like this, is it? >> no, but sometimes this happens. this is -- the administration has to work with its allies and it has to put together these coordination measures and control measures and has to do it in h
markets are sending this message. maybe the worst is over in japan, and maybe all the action in libya will not further disrupt the flow of oil. that's why in the last three days, the dow industrial average has gone up 423 points. that's about 3 1/2%. and that's why as of right now the dow jones industrial average is higher than it was on march tenth, the day before the japanese earthquake. and by the way martha, in all likelihood, 20 minutes from now, the dow jones industrial average will open higher still. it's a head scratcher, but it's going to happen. martha: it's fascinating. i guess in this sideways, stuart, you hope that the market, as it often is, is an indicator of things to come. and that stability may be accurately placed, you know. we can only hope at this point. but also merger activity giving a bit of a boost as well, right? >> that helped the market yesterday, that's for sure. at&t wants to buy t-mobile, big merger in the data transmission networking business. that gave the market is boost. but you've got to say, martha, the dow, at 12,000, despite the middle east fight
, and what will gadhafi do now? >>> radiation in food from japan. >> fukushima fresh vegetables. >> we do our own tests. >>> and an american family after ten days of hope learns their daughter was lost trying to save others. >>> men, women and jobs. which sex is getting 90% of the new jobs and why? >>> and sibling secrets. are you an older or younger sibling? news about which order gives you an edge in health and happiness. >>> good evening. as we come on the air tonight beginning this week together, the united states is still in the middle of an international assault on moammar gadhafi's libya. but the battle is moving at breakneck speed. it is called "operation odyssey dawn," and as of tonight, the skies are clear. gadhafi's forces have come to a halt though there are still big questions. how soon can the u.s. hand over the lead to other countries? who are these libyan rebels, and are we even on the same side? and what is next? will gadhafi fold, or could this go on for years? we have team coverage from washington to libya beginning with martha raddatz on what is happening right now. martha
in light of what happened over in japan. >> reporter: neighbors say every winter, storms cause a few vessels to break lose. but they say they've never seen so many adrift all at once. >> what makes you come out and look at them? >> it's just a spectacle. >> this one broke right here. >> reporter: we found boat owner gary thomas in salsalito. thomas says one of the eight morings holding his world war ii vote broke. >> every year, boats that are anchored out in this harbor, because it's a shallow harbor relatively, too much winds, older equipment and boats break free. >> reporter: the harbor administrator told us the cost of removing each of the remaining boats range from 1,500 to $3,000. he hopes to have all the boats removed by april 1st. reporting live in marin county, amber lee, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> meantime, south of the bay area at the santa cruz harbor, crews pulled out four more boats following the japan quake. crews were out using sonar equipment to lose for any debris in the harbor. the tsunami surge cost an estimated $26 million in damage to the harbor and boats. >>> on
. >>> also arc voiding further nuclear disaster in japan. pressure subsiding in one of the volatile reactors, and the government is telling the people, don't panic about radiation levels in food. from the cnn center in atlanta, hello to you, all, on this sunday. i'm t.j. holmes. we want to say hello to my colleague in london, richard quest. hello. >> a very good morning to you. i'm richard quest in the uk. we would like to welcome viewers, not only in the united states, but around the world. cnn's special coverage will continue. >> good to partner with you this morning, libya. we want to start with the coalition might being brut to bear on libya. missiles and planes streaking through the sky, pounding critical targets on the ground. it's called operation odyssey dawn. the main components right now are american and british cruise missiles and coalition airplanes. the bulk of more than 100 missiles fired at strategiic ta guess came from the american navy. u.s. president obama who was in brazil for trade discussions talked about the discussion to take military action. >> the u.s. of force is no
. keep the comments coming and we will share them throughout the show. >>> it's 9:02. latest from japan. we learned a woman in fr salisbury in the country when the tsunami hit is said to be alive and save. ashleigh debord was in korea japan. she has been there since last august. she is a member of the a program that promotes teeming and learning overseas. as americans keep track ofloved ones, japanese officials are watching over the nuclear safety of hundreds of millions in country. now japanese nuclear safety officials says the water-side the wasteful storage pool for a damaged reactor at the nuclear power plant may be boiling. the water is supposed to keep cool and prevent the spent fuel rods from resuming nuclear reactions. white house officials are saying japan is not alone in wanting to protect its people. >> the day the world comes together to support japan in its our of -- hour of need. >> keep yourself inside the house or workplaces and watch out for the situation. >> the storage pond is where there was reactor fire that released elevated radiation into the atmosphere. we will f
in japan. japan's prime minister describes the situation as grave and serious, after another dangerous radiation leak is found at the crippled fukushima nuclear power plant. u.s. navy barges are bringing fresh water to try to head off a meltdown "early" this saturday morning, march 26th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> welcome to a gorgeous spring morning in new york city. 20-something degrees. but who cares, it looks nice. >> that's a beautiful picture, russ. >> welcome to "the early show," i'm russ mitchell. >> and i'm rebecca jarvis. we begin with the latest on the battle for libya. rebels have recaptured the key eastern city of ajdabiya. nato takes control of some of the u.s.-led operation in libya in a matter of days and president obama will address the nation on monday night to explain u.s. involvement in libya. we begin our coverage with cbs news correspondent mandy clark, who is in ajdabiya this morning. mandy, good to see you. >> good morning. well, the streets of ajdabiya are relatively quiet at the moment. but it was a different scene earlier this mornin
as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunami shared by a driver who narrowly escaped when his four wheels left the road and floated away. we'll play a lot more of that video. i want to begin with libya. it's been a busy, busy and dangerous 24 hours in libya. libyan leaders claim they're observing a cease-fire, but witnesses on the ground tell cnn attacks are increasing. that's prompting calls from united states for libya to end the violence. here is the map. libya's cease-fire announcement came hours after the united nations security council imposed a no-fly zone
moammar gadhafi. >>> i'm ali velshi. there are growing concerns over radiation exposure in japan, now the u.s. military is getting ready to take an extraordinary step evacuating troops from the island. >>> and i'm kiran chetry. no relief in sight for homeowners. new numbers showing how weak the housing market is. and even more troubling, analysts said we may not have hit bottom yet. "american morning" starts right now. >>> all right. it is tuesday, march 22nd. a lot of news this morning. again, it's been a wild couple of weeks. >> and it's well into the day in japan. already another two earthquakes today. we're well into the 600s in terms of aftershocks and tremors. more concerns there. >> we're going to bring everybody up to date on that. but first, we're going to start with libya. coalition forces hammering moammar gadhafi's forces and positions as the head of forces in libya said the coalition flew 80 missions yesterday more than half of them by countries other than the united states. also saying that the dictator's momentum has been stopped, at least for now. but in misrata, which
. >>> and new u.s. assessments of the radiation risks from japan's nuclear crisis and new progress inside the plant to shed light on the damage from the sudan. i'm wolf blitzer. you are in "the situation room." >>> some very anxious hours for the u.s. military after the crash of a fighter jet, giving way to relief now that the two crew members are safely out of libya. defense officials confirming that both the pilot and the weapons officer have been rescued. they say the f-15 eagle had an equipment malfunction and did not go down because of enemy fire. let's talk more about the crash and its rescue, how it played out minute by minute, we will go to our pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. chris, you have been able to see the military's timeline. what happened? >> exactly, wolf. we have a close look at it, it really proves that no fly does not mean no risk. i mean this could have been disastrous, if these pilots had gone down in an area controlled by moammar gadhafi. two u.s. fighter jets take off from italy on a strike run to destroy moammar gadhafi's air defense. as they fly over east
could unwind the agreement in japan. it could give japan about $8 billion to spend. yahoo! japan up 3.5% in japan. the broader market big falls today. oil and airline companies right around the region, pretty much leading the indices lower. in the main benchmark there down as well as growth numbers, gdp numbers coming out of australia. the economy did grow about .7%. that is a little short of expectations. the s&p down about .5%. shanghai down by not so much. it has been a longer term selloff going on in shanghai. >>> speaking of oil prices, the price of crude peaking again late on tuesday to two-year highs on increased on risk in north africa in the middle east. nymex crude is up .16 cents in electronic trade here in asia. it's under $100 a barrel. it had been up over $100 in new york trading overnight. brent crude seen as a closer indicator of the risk premium now being built to crude oil. that's come off just a fraction. now the price is still $115.36 a barrel. it was up at $116 a little earlier. those levels the highest since august of 2008. and there's growing concern that if oil
and general myers, thank you very much. up next, we will go to japan for the latest on that country's crisis. even though i'm a great driver, and he's... not so much. well, for a driver like you, i would recommend our new snapshot discount. this little baby keeps track of your great driving habits, so you can save money. [sighs] amazing. it's like an extra bonus savings. [ cackling ] he's my ride home. how much can the snapshot discount save you? call or click today. i'm going to own my own restaurant. i want to be a volunteer firefighter. when i grow up, i want to write a novel. i want to go on a road trip. when i grow up, i'm going to go there. i'm going to work with kids. i want to fix up old houses. [ female announcer ] at aarp we believe you're never done growing. i want to fall in love again. [ female announcer ] together we can discover the best of what's next at aarp.org. >>> we want to turn now to the other big story we're following this morning, the disaster in japan from tokyo. we have anna coren. anna, what is the latest you have? >> reporter: we actually have very good news to g
>>> good evening. i'm anderson cooper live in tokyo, japan. breaking news on two fronts. in libya, the question of the hour, could the united states, europe, and other parts of the arab world about to be going to war against the regime of moammar gadhafi? that's the question, because of a u.n. security council vote, a vote which would frankly clears the way not just for a no-fly zone, not just air strikes, but all "necessary measures to protect civilians from gadhafi." we also have major new developments in the nuclear crisis to our north here in japan, including this, our first upclose look at the damaged reactor buildings. the question is, what is going on inside the wreckage? especially, especially with the spent fuel that is not inside inner containment vessels. workers scrambling to cool the damaged reactors, struggling for the last 24 hours with that. and with that today, an emergency diesel generator supplying power to units five and six. tepco, the company which runs this nuclear plant, also reporting that contrary to what the international atomic energy agency said about
, problems at that stricken nuclear power plant in japan. smoke rose from two reactors this morning. forcing the workers to evacuate. they're trying to restore power and get cooling systems operating again. this comes as there is growing concern of radiation contaminating fod and water supplies. -- food and water supplies. trace amounts have been found in food and tap water. >>> and new estimates now put the death toll at more than 18,000, with the world bank saying it will take five years to rebuild japan. >>> but there are a few bright spots. this is an amazing story of survival. an 80-year-old woman and her 16- year-old grandson were rescued from the rubble nine days after the earthquake leveled their home. they say they survived by eating food from the refrigerator. >>> so how prepared is california should a disaster like the one in japan strike here? well, that's the question that state lawmakers hope to answer in hearings that just got under way in sacramento. lawmakers will look at tsunami damage to the coastline and the state's overall preparedness. officials will also be testifying
about that lateness of response. how much did the events in japan play into the, if you like, paralysis of policymakers, their inability to deal with two gigantic issues at the same time? u. >> reporter: well, i think that is a huge problem. i mean it's not because of japan, but already you had within the consuls of the american government deep, deep divisions. you had the pentagon. defense secretary robert gates, very much against military intervention and said so publicly. so if there was going to be intervention, if it was going to move ahead quickly, it needed focused global attention, and once you had the earthquake and the tragedies that have beset japan, that attention was diverted. it's not just a problem of the government. it's also a problem of the press, and in a sense, it's a problem of all of us. we watch one thing for a few hours or days and then when something else happens we turn our attention. what happened in japan was huge. suddenly all global attention focused that and it was precisely at that moment that gadhafi was able to move ahead very, very aggressively, using
trip. >>> let's turn now to your disaster in japan. officials still racing to restore electricity to the troubled fukushima daiichi nuclear plant, but now they're facing more unforeseen obstacles, including a cloud of smoke that forced workers to evacuate again today. now, when power is finally restored, officials say the cooling system should bring temperatures back to a safe level within those reactors within a day. meanwhile, the world's health organization is calling on japan to ban food sales from areas near the plant after radiation was detected in milk and spinach. and while the radiation levels in the produce was higher than normal, they say it isn't enough to cause all import -- food from japan to be banned. >> there's no evidence that that food is connected to daiichi, simply because there is radiation all around us, in this room and in food. and if you're a country importing food from japan and if you're looking for radiation, you'll find it. >> now, the world bank says japan may need as much as five years to rebuild from the earthquake and tsunami that caused some $235
>> coming up, days after that devastating quake hit japan triggering a tsunami, there are more difficult days ahead. >> a young girl is in the hospital after a pitbull attack. >> and the nfl sees its first lockout in more than 20 years. "11 news sunday morning" starts now. [captioning made possible by constellation energy group] >> hello, and welcome to "11 news sunday morning." i'm lisa robinson. >> and i'm sarah caldwell. our top stories in just a moment. first we want to take a look outside with sandra shaw. >> and it is nice people are still out. it is going to be decent today. a little cooler today. 58 degrees. kind of a prelude to spring. you have -- if you have to spring forward, it should feel like it, right? we're going to see mostly sunny to partly cloudy skies. a dry cold front is on the move. it will not develop precipitation as it moves across the atlantic. all and all we'll see a shift in the winds. that's all you will notice with this front. somewhat breezy for this afternoon. how mild is it how? maybe people are out because it is comfortable. 48 in annapolis. ag
. the nuclear crisis in japan taking a new and potentially dangerous turn today. japan's nuclear safety agency warning the situation at the quake-damaged reactor, that it may not be under control. japanese engineers considering a last-ditch effort to prevent a full-scale meltdown. the government is calling it a race against time to prevent a cat traffic radiation leak that could affect millions of people. priority one, cooling the overheating fuel rods, trying to prevent a massive radiation leak. that may run into problems as well. trace gallagher has more. trace? >> reporter: experts have been saying for days that japan has been downplaying the severity of the crisis. they've upped the crisis from a four to a five. the country is saying they're overwhelmed and calling for the united states to help them stop this crisis. they've gotten some power to reactor 2. the hope is, they can use that power to turn on the cooling pump to get cool water on the reactors and spent fuel rods, but there's a problem. the l.a. times is reporting that nuclear regulatory commission believes the pool holding the s
association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in finding out from you in our first 45 minutes this morning if what we were seeing in japan, not only with the disaster, but also in the reaction from the japanese authorities there, could prove threatening for the u
is in japan hit the food supply. >>> a star athlete killed. who police believe tried to cover up this crime. >>> an inmate in virginia served nearly 30 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit. we'll tell you what finally set him free. >>> possible merger of at&t and t-mobile. it could impact thousands. whether you have that service or not. >>> guys, coming up in sports, george mason gets lost in a sea of red. >>> also, vcu keeps winning in the ncaa tournament. and how long will the capitals be without >>> more problems for arlington national cemetery. now poor record keeping is being blamed for reservations that are being lost in the system. the cemetery is still dealing with problems regarding mismarked graves. now the "washington post" reports cemetery officials are struggling to determine who has reserved plots. some of those plots may already have been filled. the reservations were made under a system that ended back in 1962. one official says the cemetery has 3,500 reservations on file. there could be more, they say, but they have no idea how many of those reservations are still v
mission to the u.n. jenna: to japan, right now that danger zone is expanding, dangerous levels of radiation now detected 25 miles away from the fukushima plant, outside the evacuation zone we've been talking about the last couple of weeks. this is certainly slowly down the discovery recovery. take a look at this, destruction in a coastal city in northern japan, a big commercial fishing port known for atracking tourists. manual that now as you take a look at these images. survivors are trying to put their lives back together from scratch. dominic di-natale is streaming live with more. >> reporter: the united states has repeatedly been calling on japan for some days to expand the exclusion zone, that is, you know, forced evacuation, to up to 30 miles outside the fukushima plant. but now we've detected that high levels are radiation are being detected 25 miles from the plant and that's been discovered recently. the japanese government seems to be under no determination at all to actually expand the solution area at all, says there's no immediate attempts at all to expand the evacu
there i know the people of japan need it in a very big way. stacy palmer, editor of the chronicle of philanthropy. thank you very much. >> thank you. >> and everybody wishing the best for the people of japan. >>> hello again, i'm fredricka whitfield at the cnn headquarters in atlanta. >> i'm michael holmes, you are watching our special worldwide coverage of the conflict in libya. >> a pentagon briefing on coalition military strikes in libya is set to begin at any moment in the states. we will bring that to you live when it happens. meantime, here is what is happening right now in libya. >> libyan army spokesperson says that the country's armed forces have ordered an immediate cease-fire. that comes after the americans, french, british military forces launched operation odyssey dawn, mission to eliminate moammar gadhafi from attacking his own people. >> multiple air and missile strikes hit libyan military targets since the operation began 24 hours ago. u.s. joint chiefs of staff chairman admiral mike mullin said most of gadhafi's air defense systems and airfields have been taken ou
nuclear reactors and now radiation is detected in japan's food supply. >>> and the education of sarah palin. the former governor criticizing the former president. does she need a few more lessons in diplomacy. >>> and the world's most famous polar bear has died suddenly. he was only 4. what happened? >>> there is word that moammar gadhafi wants to trick journalists that innocent civilians have been killed. u.s. officials say that gadhafi was not the target of a missile. he wants bodies removed from morgues and put at the site of the bombing to make it look like innocent people were killed. military officials say they have made significant progress. they believe the attacks against his own people have all but stopped and air defense batteries have been destroyed. on air force one, secretary robert gates says the united states will not be leading the charge for long. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition and have a military role in the coalition but
. >>> an amazing story in japan. people found alive nine days after the disaster. >>> hello to you all from the cnn center in atlanta. i'm t.j. holmes and also saying hello, richard who is in london this mork. hey there. >> good day you to, t.j. richard quest in london. we would like to welcome as viewers not only in the united states but around the world. this is cnn's special coverage. >>> well, we'll check in with richard in a moment. we don't what to first get you caught up with the new information we have on libya. we are hearing about new strikes today by coalition aircraft, more specifically, 19 american warplanes including stealth bombers getting involved. our people at the pentagon telling us that american carrier jets launched from the m mediterranean are firing on government ground troops. coalition forces began the assault with american and british cruise missiles and french planes. they're targeting anti-aircraft and missile sites controlled by gadhafi. one of the main areas of interest has been benghazi. this is the opposition strong hold, the site of heavy fighting between opposition
air defenses. admiral mike mullen telling cnn no-fly zone is in effect. and in japan, death toll continues to rise. it is up to more than 8,200 now. we have good news today, two survivors were found after nine days trapped. that's going to do it for us here. do want to hand it over now to candy crowley and "state of the union." >>> this morning, u.s. and international forces have effectively put in place the no-fly zone in libya. that was preceded by a furious assault of tomahawk missiles from allied forces at sea. >> this is just the first phase of what will likely be a multiphase military operation designed to enforce the united nations resolution and denied the libyan regime, at built to use force against its own people. >> the days of tough talk are over. the attack on lib yashgs tya an latest from mike mullen, centcom commander admiral william fallon and general richard meyers. then senators john mccain and joe lieberman. >> i think we can turn this tide. >> it's late. but it's not too late. >> and the fukushima reactor sparked anxiety across the world. what we really know f
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